• Corpus ID: 2790675

THE OBEDIENCE OF FAITH IN THE LETTER TO THE ROMANS Part I : The Meaning of hupakoe pisteos

@inproceedings{Garlington2005THEOO,
  title={THE OBEDIENCE OF FAITH IN THE LETTER TO THE ROMANS Part I : The Meaning of hupakoe pisteos},
  author={Don B. Garlington and Bruce Manning Metzger and Edward Epp and Gregory Darrell Fee},
  year={2005}
}
UNIQUE to the whole of pre-Christian Greek literature and to Paul himself, the phrase u[pakoh> pi<stewj, occurring in Rom 1:5 and 16:26, 1 gives voice to the design of the apostle’s missionary gospel. Within Romans itself the phrase is invested with a twofold significance. For one, against the backdrop of faith’s obedience in Jewish literature, these words assume a decidedly polemical thrust: the covenant fidelity of God’s ancient people (Israel) is now a possibility apart from assuming the… 

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