Corpus ID: 2790675

THE OBEDIENCE OF FAITH IN THE LETTER TO THE ROMANS Part I : The Meaning of hupakoe pisteos

@inproceedings{Garlington2005THEOO,
  title={THE OBEDIENCE OF FAITH IN THE LETTER TO THE ROMANS Part I : The Meaning of hupakoe pisteos},
  author={D. Garlington and B. Metzger and E. Epp and G. Fee},
  year={2005}
}
UNIQUE to the whole of pre-Christian Greek literature and to Paul himself, the phrase u[pakoh> pi<stewj, occurring in Rom 1:5 and 16:26, 1 gives voice to the design of the apostle’s missionary gospel. Within Romans itself the phrase is invested with a twofold significance. For one, against the backdrop of faith’s obedience in Jewish literature, these words assume a decidedly polemical thrust: the covenant fidelity of God’s ancient people (Israel) is now a possibility apart from assuming the… Expand

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This thoroughly revised and reset new edition of a popular commentary on a favourite Epistle amends and expands in the light of the scholarship of recent years. It is concerned not only with theExpand
SCM, 1955) 148. 31 Modified from Cranfield, Romans 1.66 n. 3. 59 See as well the comments of Dodd
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Paul has in view the totality of non-Christian humanity as disobedient to the truth. 90 In addition, Michel maintains that the antithesis of a] peiqou? ntej is self-evidently u[ pakoh> pi< stewj
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