THE NORFOLK BROADLAND: EXPERIMENTS IN THE RESTORATION OF A COMPLEX WETLAND

@article{Moss1983THENB,
  title={THE NORFOLK BROADLAND: EXPERIMENTS IN THE RESTORATION OF A COMPLEX WETLAND},
  author={Brian Moss},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={1983},
  volume={58}
}
  • B. Moss
  • Published 1 November 1983
  • History
  • Biological Reviews
1. The Norfolk Broadland comprises wide river valleys, floored with deep deposits of peat and clay. Over forty mediaeval peat pits (the Broads) became flooded after the fourteenth century and were mostly connected with the rivers by navigation channels. Between about 1400 A.D. and 1800 A.D. the valleys supported a diverse wetland ecosystem, partly maintained by deliberate cropping of wetland plants. Some of the wetland was gravity‐drained, but extensive aquatic habitats held diverse fens and… 

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Events in the plankton community of a 120 ha, shallow (1.2 m), brackish lake have been studied with the help of two watertight enclosures, each of which isolated about 300 m3 of water and its

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