THE NATURAL FLOW REGIME. A PARADIGM FOR RIVER CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION

@article{Poff1997THENF,
  title={THE NATURAL FLOW REGIME. A PARADIGM FOR RIVER CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION},
  author={N. LeRoy Poff and J. David Allan and Mark B. Bain and James R. Karr and Karen L. Prestegaard and Brian D. Richter and Richard E. Sparks and Juliet C. Stromberg},
  journal={BioScience},
  year={1997},
  volume={47},
  pages={769-784}
}
H umans have long been fascinated by the dynamism of free-flowing waters. Yet we have expended great effort to tame rivers for transportation, water supply, flood control, agriculture, and power generation. It is now recognized that harnessing of streams and rivers comes at great cost: Many rivers no longer support socially valued native species or sustain healthy ecosystems that provide important goods and services (Naiman et al. 1995, NRC 1992). 

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