THE MOST LUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE

@article{Sukhbold2016THEML,
  title={THE MOST LUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE},
  author={Tuguldur Sukhbold and S. E. Woosley},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  year={2016},
  volume={820}
}
Recent observations have revealed a stunning diversity of extremely luminous supernovae, seemingly increasing in radiant energy without bound. We consider simple approximate limits for what existing models can provide for the peak luminosity and total radiated energy for non-relativistic, isotropic stellar explosions. The brightest possible supernova is a Type I explosion powered by a sub-millisecond magnetar with field strength B ∼ few × 10 13 ?> G. In extreme cases, such models might reach a… 

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