THE MESOZOIC RADIATION OF BIRDS

@article{Chiappe2002THEMR,
  title={THE MESOZOIC RADIATION OF BIRDS},
  author={Luis Mar{\'i}a Chiappe and Gareth J. Dyke},
  journal={Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics},
  year={2002},
  volume={33},
  pages={91-124}
}
  • L. Chiappe, G. Dyke
  • Published 6 August 2002
  • Biology
  • Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics
Until recently, most knowledge of the early history of birds and the evolution of their unique specializations was based on just a handful of diverse Mesozoic taxa widely separated in time and restricted to marine environments. Although Archaeopteryx is still the oldest and only Jurassic bird, a wealth of recent discoveries combined with new phylogenetic analyses have documented the divergence of a number of lineages by the beginning of the Cretaceous. These and younger Cretaceous fossils have… 
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