THE LOST SIBLINGS OF THE SUN

@article{Zwart2009THELS,
  title={THE LOST SIBLINGS OF THE SUN},
  author={S. P. Zwart},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2009},
  volume={696}
}
  • S. P. Zwart
  • Published 2009
  • Physics
  • The Astrophysical Journal
  • The anomalous chemical abundances and the structure of the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt observed in the solar system constrain the initial mass and radius of the star cluster in which the Sun was born to M 500-3000M ☉ and R 1-3 pc. When the cluster dissolved, the siblings of the Sun dispersed through the galaxy, but they remained on a similar orbit around the Galactic center. Today these stars hide among the field stars, but 10-60 of them are still present within a distance of ~100 pc. These siblings… CONTINUE READING
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