THE LOGIC OF THE CATUSKOTI

@inproceedings{Priest2010THELO,
  title={THE LOGIC OF THE CATUSKOTI},
  author={G. Priest},
  year={2010}
}
  • G. Priest
  • Published 2010
  • Philosophy, Computer Science
  • In early Buddhist logic, it was standard to assume that for any state of affairs there were four possibilities: that it held, that it did not, both, or neither. This is the catuskoti (or tetralemma). Classical logicians have had a hard time making sense of this, but it makes perfectly good sense in the semantics of various paraconsistent logics, such as First Degree Entailment. Matters are more complicated for later Buddhist thinkers, such as Nagarjuna, who appear to suggest that none of these… CONTINUE READING

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