THE KU KLUX KLAN, LABOR, AND THE WHITE WORKING CLASS DURING THE 1920S

@article{Pegram2018THEKK,
  title={THE KU KLUX KLAN, LABOR, AND THE WHITE WORKING CLASS DURING THE 1920S},
  author={Thomas R. Pegram},
  journal={The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era},
  year={2018},
  volume={17},
  pages={373 - 396}
}
  • T. R. Pegram
  • Published 1 April 2018
  • History
  • The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Historians usually consider the revived Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s to have been consistently opposed to labor unions and the aspirations of working-class people. The official outlook of the national Klan organization fits this characterization, but the interaction between grassroots Klan groups and pockets of white Protestant working-class Americans was more complex. Some left-wing critics of capitalism singled out the Klan as a legitimate if flawed platform on which to build white working-class… 
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