THE ISLAND RULE IN LARGE MAMMALS: PALEONTOLOGY MEETS ECOLOGY

@inproceedings{Raia2006THEIR,
  title={THE ISLAND RULE IN LARGE MAMMALS: PALEONTOLOGY MEETS ECOLOGY},
  author={Pasquale Raia and Shai Meiri},
  year={2006}
}
Abstract The island rule is the phenomenon of the miniaturization of large animals and the gigantism of small animals on islands, with mammals providing the classic case studies. Several explanations for this pattern have been suggested, and departures from the predictions of this rule are common among mammals of differing body size, trophic habits, and phylogenetic affinities. Here we offer a new explanation for the evolution of body size of large insular mammals, using evidence from both… 

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 50 REFERENCES
Body Size of Insular Carnivores: Little Support for the Island Rule
TLDR
This work measured skulls and teeth of terrestrial members of the order Carnivora in order to analyze patterns of body size evolution between insular populations and their near mainland conspecifics and found no correlations were found between the size ratios of insular/mainland carnivore species and body mass.
The ‘island rule’ in birds: medium body size and its ecological explanation
  • S. Clegg, P. F. Owens
  • Environmental Science
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2002
TLDR
The results show that the island rule is valid for both body size and bill length in birds and that, in addition to feeding ecology, insular shifts in the level of intraspecific competition and the abiotic environment also have a role.
Insular Carnivore Biogeography: Island Area and Mammalian Optimal Body Size
TLDR
It is concluded that insular carnivores provide no support for theories proposing a single optimal size, and it is suspected that such theories are also flawed on theoretical grounds.
Cope's rule, the island rule and the scaling of mammalian population density
TLDR
Results show that in mammals there is an optimum body size for energy acquisition at about 1 kg, and suggest a partial explanation for another widespread ecotypic pattern, the 'island rule': that on islands, small mammal species evolve to larger size and large species to smaller size.
Dinosaurs, dragons, and dwarfs: The evolution of maximal body size
TLDR
The body mass of the top species was found to increase with increasing land area, with a slope similar to that of the relation between body mass and home range area, suggesting that maximum body size is determined by the number of home ranges that can fit into a given land area.
Body size evolution in insular vertebrates: generality of the island rule
TLDR
The generality of the island rule – the graded trend from gigantism in small species to dwarfism in larger species – for mammals and other terrestrial vertebrates on islands and island‐like ecosystems is assessed.
MAMMALIAN EVOLUTION IN THE QUATERNARY OF SOUTHERN AND EASTERN ASIA
  • D. Hooijer
  • Geology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1949
TLDR
A comparison of the Pleistocene and prehistoric material with that of the recent forms reveals a certain amount of differentiation which the various forms have undergone in the course of time.
Area, isolation and body size evolution in insular carnivores.
TLDR
Neither small nor large carnivores show a consistent area/body size relationship, and Medium-sized carnivores are no more likely to attain large size on medium-sized islands then they are to be small there.
A General Explanation for Insular Body Size Trends in Terrestrial Vertebrates
TLDR
The insular body size trends for different vertebrate families are compared and optimum body size models that use as the optimization criterion the net energy gained by an organism over a given time period are examined.
EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FOR AN OPTIMAL BODY SIZE IN SNAKES
  • S. Boback, C. Guyer
  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2003
TLDR
Three statistical patterns of body size in snakes are described, all of which indicate an optimal length of 1.0 m, suggesting that idiosyncratic features of the natural history of ectotherms allow relatively unconstrained distributions ofBody size whereas physiological limitations of endotherms constrain distributions of body sizes to a right skew.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...