• Corpus ID: 79313493

THE INFLUENCE OF SAUNA TRAINING ON THE HORMONAL SYSTEM OF YOUNG WOMEN

@inproceedings{Pilch2003THEIO,
  title={THE INFLUENCE OF SAUNA TRAINING ON THE HORMONAL SYSTEM OF YOUNG WOMEN},
  author={Wanda Pilch and Zbigniew Szyguła and Małgorzata Żychowska},
  year={2003}
}
Since there are only a few papers concerning hormonal changes in people not accustomed to sauna exposure and even less with women as the subjects, the main goal of the research was to analyze the basic responses of the hormonal system in women. Women were subjected to single and repeated thermal stress in Finnish sauna. Ten healthy female between the ages of 19-21 volunteered to participate in the experiment. All selected volunteers shared similar anthropometrical parameters. Volunteers… 

Tables from this paper

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