THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS USED IN THERAPEUTICS ON THE ACTION OF MUSCLE RELAXANTS.

@article{Emery1963THEIO,
  title={THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS USED IN THERAPEUTICS ON THE ACTION OF MUSCLE RELAXANTS.},
  author={E. R. J. Emery},
  journal={British journal of anaesthesia},
  year={1963},
  volume={35},
  pages={
          565-9
        }
}
  • E. Emery
  • Published 1 September 1963
  • Biology
  • British journal of anaesthesia
When one considers the many types of chemical compound used in modern therapeutics, it is not surprising that some of these modify the action of muscle relaxants. In general such substances may interfere with neuromuscular transmission, or may influence relaxants by actions at other sites. Some such side effects are well known. Others, based on animal experiments on many different species and under varying conditions, are more difficult to assess precisely. Nevertheless, it would be unwise for… 
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