THE HISTORY OF THE WORD FOR CACAO IN ANCIENT MESOAMERICA

@article{Kaufman2007THEHO,
  title={THE HISTORY OF THE WORD FOR CACAO IN ANCIENT MESOAMERICA},
  author={Terrence S. Kaufman and John S. Justeson},
  journal={Ancient Mesoamerica},
  year={2007},
  volume={18},
  pages={193 - 237}
}
Abstract The word *kakaw(a) (‘cacao’, Theobroma cacao) was widely diffused among Mesoamerican languages, and from there to much of lower Central America. This study provides evidence establishing beyond reasonable doubt that this word originated in the Mije-Sokean family; that it spread from the Mije-Sokean languages in or around the Olmec heartland into southeastern Mesoamerican languages; that its diffusion into Mayan languages took place between about 200 B.C. and A.D. 400; and that it… 
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