THE FAMILY OF RANNULF DE GLANVILLE

@article{Mortimer1981THEFO,
  title={THE FAMILY OF RANNULF DE GLANVILLE},
  author={Richard D. Mortimer},
  journal={Historical Research},
  year={1981},
  volume={54},
  pages={1-16}
}
  • R. Mortimer
  • Published 1 May 1981
  • History
  • Historical Research
8 Citations
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The Countess Gundred was an occasional litigant in the Curia Regis Rolls of Richard I and John. She was evidently an important person. Other women are described in the rolls as the wife or widow or