THE EVOLUTION OF TRACHEID DIAMETER IN EARLY VASCULAR PLANTS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ON THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTANCE OF THE PRIMARY XYLEM STRAND

@article{Niklas1985THEEO,
  title={THE EVOLUTION OF TRACHEID DIAMETER IN EARLY VASCULAR PLANTS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ON THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTANCE OF THE PRIMARY XYLEM STRAND},
  author={Karl J. Niklas},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1985},
  volume={39}
}
  • K. Niklas
  • Published 1 September 1985
  • Environmental Science, Geology
  • Evolution
A cumulative correlation analysis of the maximum diameter of primary xylem tracheids recorded for 41 tracheophyte fossils, plotted against their ages (ranging from the Upper Silurian to the Lower Devonian), yields a Spearman rank coefficient (rsp) of 0.696 (P < 0.01). Data for specimens taxonomically referable to zosterophyllophytes and lycopods reveal an increase in the range and maximum diameter of tracheids from the Siegenian to the Emsian. Correlation analysis of these data yields an rsp… 
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