THE EVOLUTION OF FEEDING ADAPTATIONS OF THE AQUATIC SLOTH THALASSOCNUS

@inproceedings{Muizon2004THEEO,
  title={THE EVOLUTION OF FEEDING ADAPTATIONS OF THE AQUATIC SLOTH THALASSOCNUS},
  author={Christian de Muizon and H. Gregory McDonald and Rodolfo Rubio Salas and Mario Urbina},
  year={2004}
}
Abstract The aquatic sloth Thalassocnus is represented by five species that lived along the coast of Peru from the late Miocene through the late Pliocene. A detailed comparison of the cranial and mandibular anatomy of these species indicates different feeding adaptations. The three older species of Thalassocnus (T. antiquus, T. natans, and T. littoralis) were probably partial grazers (intermediate or mixed feeders) and the transverse component of mandibular movement was very minor, if any. They… 

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Comparisons with the type species of Thalassocnus demonstrates that T. carolomartini and T. yaucensis are more similar morphologically to each other than to other species of the genus and are more derived.

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