• Corpus ID: 162499571

THE EIGHTH KARMAPA'S LIFE AND HIS INTERPRETATION OF THE GREAT SEAL

@inproceedings{Rheingans2008THEEK,
  title={THE EIGHTH KARMAPA'S LIFE AND HIS INTERPRETATION OF THE GREAT SEAL},
  author={Jim Rheingans},
  year={2008}
}
This thesis investigates the Eighth Karmapa (1507-1554) and his Great Seal instructions. It demonstrates that the Eighth Karmapa was not only one of the most significant scholars of his school, but one who mastered and taught its highest meditational precepts. The thesis argues that analysing his Great Seal teachings through studying instruction-related genres in their historical, doctrinal, and literary contexts reveals a pedagogical pragmatism. It is more useful to view the Great Seal as an… 

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