• Corpus ID: 129467571

THE EFFECT OF WINTER VERSUS SUMMER RUNNING ON LOWER EXTREMITY MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY RATE IN RECREATIONAL RUNNERS

@inproceedings{Frieseke2014THEEO,
  title={THE EFFECT OF WINTER VERSUS SUMMER RUNNING ON LOWER EXTREMITY MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY RATE IN RECREATIONAL RUNNERS},
  author={Elizabeth Frieseke},
  year={2014}
}
The effects of cryotherapy on body tissues suggest that cold exposure can decrease performance measures, including proprioception, strength, and agility. Since a decrease in proprioception and strength have been linked with an increase of injury rates, this suggests that exposure to cold conditions may increase injury rates. The main purpose of this study was to determine if there is a difference in musculoskeletal injury rates in the winter compared to the summer months in recreational runners… 

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