THE EFFECT OF MATERNAL CARE ON CHILD SURVIVAL: A DEMOGRAPHIC, GENETIC, AND EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE

@inproceedings{Pavard2007THEEO,
  title={THE EFFECT OF MATERNAL CARE ON CHILD SURVIVAL: A DEMOGRAPHIC, GENETIC, AND EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE},
  author={Samuel Pavard and Alexandre Sibert and Evelyne Heyer},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Models of population dynamics generally assume that child survival is independent of maternal survival. However, in humans, the death of a mother compromises her immature children's survival because children require postnatal care. A child's survival therefore depends on her mother's survival in years following her birth. Here, we provide a model incorporating this relationship and providing the number of children surviving until maturity achieved by females at each age. Using… 
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