THE ECOLOGY OF ARCTIC AND ALPINE PLANTS

@article{Billings1968THEEO,
  title={THE ECOLOGY OF ARCTIC AND ALPINE PLANTS},
  author={W. D. Billings and H. Mooney},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={1968},
  volume={43}
}
‘How are plants adapted to the low temperatures and other stresses of arctic and alpine environments ?’ At present it is not possible to answer this question completely. Much work remains to be done, particularly on low‐temperature metabolism, frost resistance, and the environmental cues and requirements for flowering, dormancy, regrowth, and germination. However, in brief, we can say that plants are adapted to these severe environments by employing combinations of the following general… Expand
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