THE EARLY DIVERSIFICATION HISTORY OF DIDELPHID MARSUPIALS: A WINDOW INTO SOUTH AMERICA'S “SPLENDID ISOLATION”

@article{Jansa2014THEED,
  title={THE EARLY DIVERSIFICATION HISTORY OF DIDELPHID MARSUPIALS: A WINDOW INTO SOUTH AMERICA'S “SPLENDID ISOLATION”},
  author={Sharon A. Jansa and F. Keith Barker and Robert S. Voss},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2014},
  volume={68}
}
The geological record of South American mammals is spatially biased because productive fossil sites are concentrated at high latitudes. [...] Key Result Optimizations of habitat and geography on this phylogeny suggest that (1) basal didelphid lineages inhabited South American moist forests; (2) didelphids did not diversify in dry-forest habitats until the Late Miocene; and (3) most didelphid lineages did not enter North America until the Pliocene.Expand
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