THE DISTRIBUTION AND NATURE OF COLOUR VISION AMONG THE MAMMALS

@article{Jacobs1993THEDA,
  title={THE DISTRIBUTION AND NATURE OF COLOUR VISION AMONG THE MAMMALS},
  author={Gerald H. Jacobs},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={1993},
  volume={68}
}
  • G. H. Jacobs
  • Published 1 August 1993
  • Biology
  • Biological Reviews
1. An oft-cited view, derived principally from the writings of Gordon L. Walls, is that relatively few mammalian species have a capacity for colour vision. This review has evaluated that proposition in the light of recent research on colour vision and its mechanisms in mammals. 2. To yield colour vision a retina must contain two or more spectrally discrete types of photopigment. While this is a necessary condition, it is not a sufficient one. This means, in particular, that inferences about the… 
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