THE DATE OF THE VATICAN ILLUMINATED HANDY TABLES OF PTOLEMY AND OF ITS EARLY ADDITIONS

@inproceedings{Wright1985THEDO,
  title={THE DATE OF THE VATICAN ILLUMINATED HANDY TABLES OF PTOLEMY AND OF ITS EARLY ADDITIONS},
  author={David H. Wright},
  year={1985}
}
In an important article in this Journal for 1978, loannis Spatharakis sought to date the wriiing of Vatican gr. 1291 to the reign of Theophilus (829-842), instead of Leo V (813-820), s commonly supposed, and he sought to show that the first two miniatures in it are early additions probably of the second half of the ninth Century. Independently, Otto Neugebauer, in his magisterial History of Ancient Mathematical Astronomy published in 1975, had given much helpful Information about the contents… 
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References

SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE PTOLEMY MS. VAT. GR. 1291: ITS DATE AND THE TWO INITIAL MINIATURES
The celebrated Codex Vat. gr. 1291, a copy of the Manual Tables of Ptolemy (mid 2nd cent. A. D.) in Byzantine uncial, is decorated with miniatures which derive from Hellenistic models and are