THE BITTERLING–MUSSEL COEVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIP IN AREAS OF RECENT AND ANCIENT SYMPATRY

@article{Reichard2010THEBC,
  title={THE BITTERLING–MUSSEL COEVOLUTIONARY RELATIONSHIP IN AREAS OF RECENT AND ANCIENT SYMPATRY},
  author={M. Reichard and M. Pola{\vc}ik and A. Tarkan and R. Spence and {\"O}zcan Gaygusuz and E. Ercan and M. Ondra{\vc}kov{\'a} and Carl Smith},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2010},
  volume={64}
}
Host–parasite relationships are often characterized by the rapid evolution of parasite adaptations to exploit their host, and counteradaptations in the host to avoid the costs imposed by parasitism. Hence, the current coevolutionary state between a parasite and its hosts is predicted to vary according to the history of sympatry and local abundance of interacting species. We compared a unique reciprocal coevolutionary relationship of a fish, the European bitterling (Rhodeus amarus) and… Expand
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