THE AUSTRALIAN WORKERLESS INQUILINE ANT STRUMIGENYS XENOS BROWN (HYMENOPTERA-FORMICIDAE) RECORDED FROM NEW ZEALAND

@article{Taylor1968THEAW,
  title={THE AUSTRALIAN WORKERLESS INQUILINE ANT STRUMIGENYS XENOS BROWN (HYMENOPTERA-FORMICIDAE) RECORDED FROM NEW ZEALAND},
  author={R. W. D. Taylor},
  journal={New Zealand Entomologist},
  year={1968},
  volume={4},
  pages={47-49}
}
Of the 1,200 or so Australian ant species only two are known definitely to be social parasites of other ants. One of these is Strumigenys xenos Brown (Subfamily Myrmicinae) (Fig. 1), a workerless inquiline found in colonies of the closely related S. perplexa (F. Smith) (Brown, 1955) (Fig. 2). S. perplexa ranges from southeastern and southwestern Australia to Tasmania, Lord Howe Island, Norfolk Island and the North Island of New Zealand. It was first collected in New Zealand at Tairua, on the… 

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References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES

Australian material of S. xenos is deposited with Auckland Institute and Museum, and with Entomology Division

  • *Specimens in Australian National Insect Collection

The ants of the Three Kings Islands

  • 1962

The first social parasite

  • 1955