THE “ACOUSTIC ADAPTATION HYPOTHESIS”—A REVIEW OF THE EVIDENCE FROM BIRDS, ANURANS AND MAMMALS

@article{Ey2009THEA,
  title={THE “ACOUSTIC ADAPTATION HYPOTHESIS”—A REVIEW OF THE EVIDENCE FROM BIRDS, ANURANS AND MAMMALS},
  author={E. Ey and J. Fischer},
  journal={Bioacoustics},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={21 - 48}
}
ABSTRACT The acoustic properties of the environment influence sound propagation. Many previous studies examined whether various species of anurans, birds and mammals adjust usage and/or structure of their vocal signals to limit degradation during propagation in this environment (“acoustic adaptation hypothesis”). The present review examines how widespread such adaptations actually are across taxa. First, evidence for environment-related adjustments in usage of vocal signals is collected from… Expand
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