TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK WITH A LOCAL MASS DEPLETION: A SUCCESSFUL SCENARIO FOR THE FORMATION OF MARS

@article{Izidoro2013TERRESTRIALPF,
  title={TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION IN A PROTOPLANETARY DISK WITH A LOCAL MASS DEPLETION: A SUCCESSFUL SCENARIO FOR THE FORMATION OF MARS},
  author={Andr{\'e} Izidoro and Nader Haghighipour and Othon C. Winter and Masayoshi Tsuchida},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={782},
  pages={31}
}
Models of terrestrial planet formation for our solar system have been successful in producing planets with masses and orbits similar to those of Venus and Earth. However, these models have generally failed to produce Mars-sized objects around 1.5 AU. The body that is usually formed around Mars' semimajor axis is, in general, much more massive than Mars. Only when Jupiter and Saturn are assumed to have initially very eccentric orbits (e ~ 0.1), which seems fairly unlikely for the solar system… 
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