Systemic hypoxia causes cutaneous vasodilation in healthy humans.

@article{Simmons2007SystemicHC,
  title={Systemic hypoxia causes cutaneous vasodilation in healthy humans.},
  author={Grant H. Simmons and Christopher T. Minson and Jean-Luc Cracowski and John R. Halliwill},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={103 2},
  pages={
          608-15
        }
}
Hypoxia and hypercapnia represent special challenges to homeostasis because of their effects on sympathetic outflow and vascular smooth muscle. In the cutaneous vasculature, even small changes in perfusion can shift considerable blood volume to the periphery and thereby impact both blood pressure regulation and thermoregulation. However, little is known about the influence of hypoxia and hypercapnia on this circulation. In the present study, 35 healthy subjects were instrumented with two… 

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