Systematics and evolution of Heteroptera: 25 years of progress.

@article{Weirauch2011SystematicsAE,
  title={Systematics and evolution of Heteroptera: 25 years of progress.},
  author={Christiane Weirauch and Randall T. Schuh},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2011},
  volume={56},
  pages={
          487-510
        }
}
Heteroptera, or true bugs, are part of the most successful radiation of nonholometabolous insects. Twenty-five years after the first review on the influence of cladistics on systematic research in Heteroptera, we summarize progress, problems, and future directions in the field. The few hypotheses on infraordinal relationships conflict on crucial points. Understanding relationships within Gerromorpha, Nepomorpha, Leptopodomorpha, Cimicomorpha, and Pentatomomorpha is improving, but progress… 
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