Systematic review of the effect of education on survival in Alzheimer's disease

@article{Paradise2009SystematicRO,
  title={Systematic review of the effect of education on survival in Alzheimer's disease},
  author={Matt Paradise and Claudia Cooper and Gill Livingston},
  journal={International Psychogeriatrics},
  year={2009},
  volume={21},
  pages={25 - 32}
}
ABSTRACT Background: According to the cognitive reserve model, higher levels of education compensate for the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), delaying its clinical manifestations. This model suggests that for any level of cognitive impairment, people with more education have worse neuropathology than those with less education and will therefore have shorter survival post-diagnosis. This is the first systematic review of the relationship between more education and decreased survival… 
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