Systematic review of the comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome with other disorders: what are the causes and implications?

@article{Whitehead2002SystematicRO,
  title={Systematic review of the comorbidity of irritable bowel syndrome with other disorders: what are the causes and implications?},
  author={W. Whitehead and O. Palsson and Kenneth r. Jones},
  journal={Gastroenterology},
  year={2002},
  volume={122 4},
  pages={
          1140-56
        }
}
BACKGROUND & AIMS Comorbid or extraintestinal symptoms occur frequently with irritable bowel syndrome and account for up to three fourths of excess health care visits. This challenges the assumption that irritable bowel is a distinct disorder. The aims of this study were to (1) assess comorbidity in 3 areas: gastrointestinal disorders, psychiatric disorders, and nongastrointestinal somatic disorders; and (2) evaluate explanatory hypotheses. METHODS The scientific literature since 1966 in all… Expand
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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects 10% to 27% of the United States population. In most patients with IBS, anxiety, depression, andExpand
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