Systematic Review of Attitudes Toward Donation After Cardiac Death Among Healthcare Providers and the General Public*

@article{Bastami2013SystematicRO,
  title={Systematic Review of Attitudes Toward Donation After Cardiac Death Among Healthcare Providers and the General Public*},
  author={Sohaila Bastami and Oliver Matthes and Tanja Krones and Nikola Biller-Andorno},
  journal={Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={41},
  pages={897–905}
}
Objective:Organ donation after cardiac death (DCD) is one promising possibility of combating the organ shortage, but it raises ethical issues that differ from those raised in donation after brain death (DBD). Also, DCD may be perceived differently than DBD by medical staff and the public. The aim of this article is to systematically review empirical studies on attitudes of medical personnel and the public toward DCD and to discuss the findings from an ethical perspective. Our study was… 
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Key barriers included a lack of knowledge about DCD, psychological barriers for DCD vs. brain death, concerns about whether death has been reached, saving vs. killing patients, trust in the organ procurement organization, moving from saving patients to being a donation advocate, and concerns with the DCD process.
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