Systematic Review: Strategies for Using Exercise Therapy To Improve Outcomes in Chronic Low Back Pain

@article{Hayden2005SystematicRS,
  title={Systematic Review: Strategies for Using Exercise Therapy To Improve Outcomes in Chronic Low Back Pain},
  author={Jill A Hayden and Maurits W. van Tulder and George Tomlinson},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={142},
  pages={776-785}
}
Context Which types of exercise therapy are most beneficial to patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain? Contribution This Bayesian meta-regression of 43 trials suggests that the most effective exercises for improving pain and function in adults with chronic low back pain are stretching and strengthening, respectively. Exercise performed over longer periods of time seemed more effective than exercise performed less than 20 hours total. Supervised programs that were individually tailored… Expand
Some types of exercise are more effective than others in people with chronic low back pain: a network meta-analysis.
TLDR
Evidence is found that Pilates, McKenzie therapy and functional restoration were more effective than other types of exercise treatment for reducing pain intensity and functional limitations and people with chronic low back pain should be encouraged to perform the exercise that they enjoy to promote adherence. Expand
Meta-Analysis: Exercise Therapy for Nonspecific Low Back Pain
TLDR
This meta-analysis summarizes data from 61 randomized, controlled trials that compared exercise therapy with placebo, no treatment, conservative management, or another exercise group to conclude that the evidence did not support effectiveness of exercises for acute low back pain but that exercises may be helpful for chronicLow back pain. Expand
Exercise and nonspecific low back pain: a literature review.
TLDR
The results show that exercise is effective in the primary and secondary prevention of low back pain and one-on-one sessions are superior to group sessions. Expand
Exercise therapy for chronic low back pain: protocol for an individual participant data meta-analysis
TLDR
An individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis will be undertaken, which will allow to standardize analyses across studies and directly derive results, and to examine differential treatment effects across individuals to estimate how patients’ characteristics modify treatment benefit. Expand
Conservative non-pharmacological treatment for chronic low back pain
TLDR
It is found that exercise therapy significantly reduces pain and improves function in adults with chronic low back pain, particularly in patients visiting primary care providers because of back pain. Expand
Exercise therapy for treatment of non-specific low back pain.
TLDR
Exercise therapy appears to be slightly effective at decreasing pain and improving function in adults with chronic low-back pain, particularly in healthcare populations. Expand
Effect of Home Exercise Training in Patients with Nonspecific Low-Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
TLDR
Home-based exercise training improved pain intensity and functional limitation parameters in LBP and yoga improved functional limitation. Expand
[Therapeutic exercise for patients with chronic low-back pain].
TLDR
There is no significant evidence that one particular type of exercise is clearly more effective than others in patients with CLBP, and studies suggest that individually tailored, supervised exercise programs are associated with the best outcomes. Expand
Exercise interventions for the treatment of chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
TLDR
The results found a beneficial effect for strength/resistance and coordination/stabilisation exercise programs over other interventions in the treatment of chronic low back pain and that cardiorespiratory and combined exercise programs are ineffective. Expand
Comparing the effectiveness of group-based exercise to other non-pharmacological interventions for chronic low back pain: A systematic review.
TLDR
There is strong evidence of no difference between group exercise and other non-pharmacologic interventions for disability level and pain scores 3-month post-intervention in people with chronic LBP. Expand
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Meta-Analysis: Exercise Therapy for Nonspecific Low Back Pain
TLDR
This meta-analysis summarizes data from 61 randomized, controlled trials that compared exercise therapy with placebo, no treatment, conservative management, or another exercise group to conclude that the evidence did not support effectiveness of exercises for acute low back pain but that exercises may be helpful for chronicLow back pain. Expand
Manual Therapy and Exercise Therapy in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trial With 1-Year Follow-up
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Although significant improvements were observed in both groups, the manual therapy group showed significantly larger improvements than the exercise therapy group on all outcome variables throughout the entire experimental period. Expand
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TLDR
The general lack of treatment specificity suggests that the main effects of the therapies were educed not through the reversal of physical weaknesses targeted by the corresponding exercise modality, but rather through some "central" effect, perhaps involving an adjustment of perception in relation to pain and disability. Expand
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TLDR
In acute back pain, exercise therapy is ineffective, whereas in subacute backPain, exercises with a graded activity program, and in chronic back pain; intensive exercising, deserve attention. Expand
Efficiency and Costs of Medical Exercise Therapy, Conventional Physiotherapy, and Self‐Exercise in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Pragmatic, Randomized, Single‐Blinded, Controlled Trial With 1‐Year Follow‐Up
TLDR
No difference was observed between the medical exercise therapy and conventional physiotherapy groups, but both were significantly better than self‐exercise group, and patient satisfaction was highest formedical exercise therapy. Expand
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TLDR
The active progressive treatment program was more successful in reducing pain and self-experienced disability and also in improving lumbar endurance than was the passive control treatment, however, the group difference in lumbr endurance tended to diminish at the 1-year follow-up. Expand
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TLDR
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