Syringeal Structure and Avian Phonation

@inproceedings{Gaunt1985SyringealSA,
  title={Syringeal Structure and Avian Phonation},
  author={Abbot S. Gaunt and Sandra L. L. Gaunt},
  year={1985}
}
Studies of syringeal function have historically been hampered by two difficulties, one technical and one perceptual. The technical difficulty is that because the syrinx is at the base of a long trachea and because its functioning is distorted if the surrounding interclavicular airsac is ruptured, direct observation of natural syringeal function has so far proved impossible. Hence, all analyses of syringeal function are based on indirect evidence. Such evidence may be obtained from dissections… Expand
S26-3 Aspects of syringeal mechanics in avian phonation
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TLDR
The in situ biomechanics of the vocal organ, the syrinx, was studied in anesthetized pigeons using fiberoptic instruments and the activity of the syringeal muscles appears to have a mainly modulatory function, suggesting that the basic sound-generation mechanism is similar in both air-induced and natural phonation. Expand
Direct observation of syringeal muscle function in songbirds and a parrot.
The role of syringeal muscles in controlling the aperture of the avian vocal organ, the syrinx, was evaluated directly for the first time by observing and filming through an endoscope whileExpand
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  • S. Nowicki, R. Capranica
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  • The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
  • 1986
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The results suggest that coupling arises from a passive physical interaction between the 2 syringeal sources which is activated or regulated in some fashion by neural control from either side. Expand
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Indirect tests as well as direct measurements of syringeal vibrations support a vibration-based sound-generating mechanism even for tonal sounds, and suggest that the medial tympaniform membranes play a role in adjusting tension on the labia. Expand
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This study analyzes the morphology and histology of the larynx of three species of Testudinidae in order to ascertain the presence of vibrating acoustic structure, and proposes a general model for phonation in tortoises. Expand
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Syringeal complexity may not be an adaptation for plastic vocal behavior, but it is permissive of and probably prerequisite for such behavior. Expand
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A careful study of the functional anatomy of its syrinx in the Common Crow contradicts the view expressed by Welty (1963) that this species is not capable of vocal versatility, i.e. significant variation in pitch and variety of notes produced. Expand
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The pigeon syrinx is markedly different to that organ in most other birds, and although basically a simple structure, shows a number of unique modifications, the significance of which cannot readilyExpand
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TLDR
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TLDR
The Greenewalt model is examined in the light of recent findings, many of which support its major contentions and implications, but the model seems to have certain weaknesses in describing the interactions of pressure, tension, and membrane movement, hence the linkage of AM and FM. Expand
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TLDR
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Reducing interclavicular air sac pressures increases the harmonic complexity of the calls and the effect is most pronounced in adult females and ducklings, while opening the sac to the atmosphere reduces the intensity of calling in adults and Ducklings. Expand
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TLDR
Variations in syringeal structure within families Corvidae (Corvus corone, C. frugilegus), Sturnidae (Sturnus vulgaris, Gracula religiosa), Turdidae (Turdus merula, Erithacus rubecula) and Paridae (Parus major, Aegithalos caudatus) are described and discussed and the significance of these findings in relation to bird sound production is discussed. Expand
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