Synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a typical eukaryotic phospholipid, is necessary for full virulence of the intracellular bacterial parasite Brucella abortus.

@article{Condelvarez2006SynthesisOP,
  title={Synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a typical eukaryotic phospholipid, is necessary for full virulence of the intracellular bacterial parasite Brucella abortus.},
  author={Raquel Conde-{\'A}lvarez and Mar{\'i}a Jes{\'u}s Grill{\'o} and Suzana P Salcedo and Mar{\'i}a-Jes{\'u}s de Miguel and Emilie Fugier and Jean-Pierre Gorvel and Ignacio Moriy{\'o}n and Maite Iriarte},
  journal={Cellular microbiology},
  year={2006},
  volume={8 8},
  pages={1322-35}
}
Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a typical eukaryotic phospholipid absent from most prokaryotes. Thus, its presence in some intracellular bacteria is intriguing as it may constitute host mimicry. The role of PC in Brucella abortus was examined by generating mutants in pcs (BApcs) and pmtA (BApmtA), which encode key enzymes of the two bacterial PC biosynthetic routes, the choline and methyl-transferase pathways. In rich medium, BApcs and the double mutant BApcspmtA but not BApmtA displayed reduced… CONTINUE READING