Synesthetic Colors Determined by Having Colored Refrigerator Magnets in Childhood

@article{Witthoft2006SynestheticCD,
  title={Synesthetic Colors Determined by Having Colored Refrigerator Magnets in Childhood},
  author={Nathan Witthoft and Jonathan A. Winawer},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2006},
  volume={42},
  pages={175-183}
}
Synesthesia is a condition in which percepts in one modality reliably elicit secondary perceptions in the same or a different modality that are not in the stimulus. In a common manifestation, synesthetes see colors in response to spoken or written letters, words and numbers. In this paper we demonstrate that the particular colors seen by a grapheme-color synesthete AED were learned from a set of refrigerator magnets and that the synesthesia later transferred to Cyrillic in a systematic way… Expand
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