Synaptic plasticity at developing neuromuscular junctions: role of the timing of spike activity in the competing inputs

Abstract

The development of the nervous system is based on genetic as well as epigenetic mechanisms: among the latter a prominent role is played both by chemical factors (neurotrophins being an important class) and by the electrical impulse activity. The result of these developmental interactions is the complex set of synaptic connections that characterize the adult nervous system. One remarkable aspect of embryonic development is the initial formation of profuse synaptic connections, followed during late embryonic and early post-natal life by withdrawal of a surprisingly high number of albeit fully functional synaptic inputs. Meanwhile the remaining inputs enlarge and become stronger. It is of great advantage for investigative reasons that these processes, collectively known as “synaptic elimination”, occur not only in the CNS but also in the much simpler and accessible structures of the PNS and in particular at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) (for review: Katz and Shatz, 1996; Buffelli et al., 2004; Tapia and Lichtman, 2008). Here synaptic elimination determines, in all muscles, a shift from the poly-neuronal Synaptic plasticity at developing neuromuscular junctions: role of the timing of spike activity in the competing inputs

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Buffelli2012SynapticPA, title={Synaptic plasticity at developing neuromuscular junctions: role of the timing of spike activity in the competing inputs}, author={Mario Buffelli}, year={2012} }