Synaptic mechanisms for plasticity in neocortex.

@article{Feldman2009SynapticMF,
  title={Synaptic mechanisms for plasticity in neocortex.},
  author={Daniel E Feldman},
  journal={Annual review of neuroscience},
  year={2009},
  volume={32},
  pages={
          33-55
        }
}
Sensory experience and learning alter sensory representations in cerebral cortex. The synaptic mechanisms underlying sensory cortical plasticity have long been sought. Recent work indicates that long-term cortical plasticity is a complex, multicomponent process involving multiple synaptic and cellular mechanisms. Sensory use, disuse, and training drive long-term potentiation and depression (LTP and LTD), homeostatic synaptic plasticity and plasticity of intrinsic excitability, and structural… CONTINUE READING

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