Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences

@article{Simner2006SynaesthesiaTP,
  title={Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences},
  author={Julia Simner and Catherine M. Mulvenna and Noam Sagiv and Elias Tsakanikos and Sarah A Witherby and Christine Fraser and Kirsten M. Scott and Jamie Ward},
  journal={Perception},
  year={2006},
  volume={35},
  pages={1024 - 1033}
}
Sensory and cognitive mechanisms allow stimuli to be perceived with properties relating to sight, sound, touch, etc, and ensure, for example, that visual properties are perceived as visual experiences, rather than sounds, tastes, smells, etc. Theories of normal development can be informed by cases where this modularity breaks down, in a condition known as synaesthesia. Conventional wisdom has held that this occurs extremely rarely (0.05% of births) and affects women more than men. Here we… Expand
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