Symptomatic primary HIV infection or risk experiences? Circumstances surrounding HIV testing and diagnosis among recent seroconverters.

Abstract

Our objective was to understand the circumstances surrounding HIV testing among recent HIV seroconverters (n=80) compared to HIV-negative controls (n=106) in Ontario, Canada using self-reported interview data. Diagnosis of symptomatic primary HIV infection (SPHI) was defined as diagnosis by the participant's physician. Testing in response to symptoms was reported by 42% of seroconverters vs 12% of controls. More controls than seroconverters tested in response to risk behaviour (70% vs 50%) or from a desire to know their status (34% vs 12%). Among seroconverters, 76% reported 'flu-like' illness during the time period of infection, 66% had symptoms consistent with SPHI, and 35% reported a physician's diagnosis of SPHI. Compared to seroconverters with undiagnosed SPHI, more of those diagnosed with SPHI had rash (odds ratio=4.5). SPHI plays a significant role in HIV testing and subsequent early diagnosis in this population. More seroconversions could be diagnosed with better patient and physician awareness of its symptoms.

Cite this paper

@article{Burchell2003SymptomaticPH, title={Symptomatic primary HIV infection or risk experiences? Circumstances surrounding HIV testing and diagnosis among recent seroconverters.}, author={Ann N. Burchell and Liviana Calzavara and Nancy L Ramuscak and Ted Myers and Carol Major and Anita Rochelle Rachlis and Kevin A Gough and Janet M. Raboud and Robert S . Remis}, journal={International journal of STD & AIDS}, year={2003}, volume={14 9}, pages={601-8} }