Sympatric speciation in phytophagous insects: moving beyond controversy?

@article{Berlocher2002SympatricSI,
  title={Sympatric speciation in phytophagous insects: moving beyond controversy?},
  author={Stewart H. Berlocher and Jeffrey L. Feder},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2002},
  volume={47},
  pages={
          773-815
        }
}
Sympatric speciation is the splitting of one evolutionary lineage into two without the occurrence of geographic isolation. The concept has been intimately tied to entomology since the 1860s, when Benjamin Walsh proposed that many host-specific phytophagous insects originate by shifting and adapting to new host plant species. If true, sympatric speciation would have tremendous implications for our understanding of species and their origins, biodiversity (25-40% of all animals are thought to be… Expand
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TLDR
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