Corpus ID: 236772749

Symmetry breaking indices for the Cartesian product of graphs

@inproceedings{Alikhani2021SymmetryBI,
  title={Symmetry breaking indices for the Cartesian product of graphs},
  author={Saeid Alikhani and Mohammad Hadi Shekarriz},
  year={2021}
}
A vertex coloring is called distinguishing if the identity is the only automorphism that can preserve it. The distinguishing number of a graph is the minimum number of colors required for such a coloring. The distinguishing threshold of a graph G is the minimum number of colors k required that any arbitrary k-coloring of G is distinguishing. We prove a statement that gives a necessary and sufficient condition for a vertex coloring of the Cartesian product to be distinguishing. Then we use it to… Expand

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