Symmetry and human facial attractiveness.

@article{Perrett1999SymmetryAH,
  title={Symmetry and human facial attractiveness.},
  author={David Ian Perrett and D Michael Burt and Ian S. Penton-Voak and Kieran Lee and Duncan Rowland and Rachel Edwards},
  journal={Evolution and Human Behavior},
  year={1999},
  volume={20},
  pages={295-307}
}
Abstract Symmetry may act as a marker of phenotypic and genetic quality and is preferred during mate selection in a variety of species. Measures of human body symmetry correlate with attractiveness, but studies manipulating human face images report a preference for asymmetry. These results may reflect unnatural feature shapes and changes in skin textures introduced by image processing. When the shape of facial features is varied (with skin textures held constant), increasing symmetry of face… 

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