Symmetry Groupoids and Patterns of Synchrony in Coupled Cell Networks

@article{Stewart2003SymmetryGA,
  title={Symmetry Groupoids and Patterns of Synchrony in Coupled Cell Networks},
  author={I. N. Stewart and Martin Golubitsky and Marcus Pivato},
  journal={SIAM J. Appl. Dyn. Syst.},
  year={2003},
  volume={2},
  pages={609-646}
}
A coupled cell system is a network of dynamical systems, or "cells," coupled together. Such systems can be represented schematically by a directed graph whose nodes correspond to cells and whose edges represent couplings. A symmetry of a coupled cell system is a permutation of the cells that preserves all internal dynamics and all couplings. Symmetry can lead to patterns of synchronized cells, rotating waves, multirhythms, and synchronized chaos. We ask whether symmetry is the only mechanism… 

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