Symbiotic bacteria living in the hoopoe's uropygial gland prevent feather degradation

@article{RuizRodrguez2009SymbioticBL,
  title={Symbiotic bacteria living in the hoopoe's uropygial gland prevent feather degradation},
  author={Magdalena Ruiz‐Rodr{\'i}guez and Eva Valdivia and Juan Jos{\'e} Soler and Manuel Mart{\'i}n-Vivaldi and Antonio Manuel Mart{\'i}n-Platero and Manuel Mart{\'i}nez-Bueno},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={212},
  pages={3621 - 3626}
}
SUMMARY Among potential agents that might damage bird feathers are certain microorganisms which secrete enzymes that digest keratin, as is the case of the ubiquitous bacterium Bacillus licheniformis, present in both the feathers and skin of wild birds. It is therefore a good candidate for testing the effects of bird defences against feather-degrading microorganisms. One of these defences is the oil secreted by the uropygial gland, which birds use to protect their feathers against parasites. In… 
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