Symbiosis and the origin of life

@article{King2004SymbiosisAT,
  title={Symbiosis and the origin of life},
  author={G.A.M. King},
  journal={Origins of life},
  year={2004},
  volume={8},
  pages={39-53}
}
  • G. King
  • Published 1 April 1977
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Origins of life
The paper uses chemical kinetic arguments and illustrations by computer modelling to discuss the origin and evolution of life. Complex self-reproducing chemical systems cannot arise spontaneously, whereas simple auto-catalytic systems can, especially in an irradiated aqueous medium. Self-reproducing chemical particles of any complexity, in an appropriate environment, have a self-regulating property which permits long-term survival. However, loss of materials from the environment can lead to… Expand
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