Symbionts of societies that fission: mites as guests or parasites of army ants

@article{Berghoff2009SymbiontsOS,
  title={Symbionts of societies that fission: mites as guests or parasites of army ants},
  author={S. Berghoff and E. Wurst and E. Ebermann and A. Sendova-Franks and C. Rettenmeyer and N. Franks},
  journal={Ecological Entomology},
  year={2009},
  volume={34}
}
1 Recently, Hughes et al. (Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 23, 672–677, 2008) have theorised that symbionts of large, long‐lived, homeostatic, and well defended social insect colonies should mostly be of low virulence. If the symbionts are rare, i.e. few workers are co‐infected, competition between symbionts should be minimal and they should be selected to avoid over‐exploiting their hosts. 2 Here we analyse the mites that occur on Eciton burchellii army ant workers and note that our findings… Expand
Ecological characteristics of insects that affect symbiotic relationships with mites
TLDR
It is found that both solitary and social insects, including parasocial and subsocial insects, harbor numbers of symbionts including species‐specific ones but few dangerous mite symbiont in their nests or habitats under natural conditions. Expand
Evolution of conflict and cooperation of nematodes associated with solitary and social sweat bees
TLDR
This is the first comparative study to test the idea that host social structure may influence the evolution of symbionts; future work should compare closely related mutualists and parasites of more advanced eusocial insects to mutualist and parasite of solitary insects. Expand
The diversity and host specificity of mites associated with ants: the roles of ecological and life history traits of ant hosts
TLDR
It is suggested that greater ant diversity also supports a greater diversity of associated mites, but that mite diversity is disproportionately higher in ant species with greater resource availability within nests or those that may facilitate the exchange of mite assemblages among ant nests. Expand
Macrodinychus mites as parasitoids of invasive ants: an overlooked parasitic association
TLDR
This is the ninth species of Macrodinychus reported as ant parasite, and the third known as parasitoid of invasive ants, confirming a unique habit in the evolution of mite feeding strategies and suggesting that the entire genus might be parasitic on ants. Expand
Cryptic diversity, high host specificity and reproductive synchronization in army ant‐associated Vatesus beetles
TLDR
It is shown that Vatesus beetles are highly adapted to the symbiosis with army ants, in that their reproduction and larval development are synchronized with the stereotypical reproductive and behavioural cycles of their host colonies. Expand
Army imposters: diversification of army ant-mimicking beetles with their Eciton hosts
TLDR
Current taxonomic treatments of Eciton and its Ecitomorpha and Ecitophya associates need revision after it was revealed that patterns of diversification for the myrmecophiles are also consistent with specialisation to a particular host across broad geographical areas but not at small geographical scales. Expand
The largest animal association centered on one species: the army ant Eciton burchellii and its more than 300 associates
TLDR
The first comprehensive list of animals known to be found in the company of a single army ant species: Eciton burchellii is given, which comprises the largest described animal association centering around one particular species. Expand
Fossil amber reveals springtails’ longstanding dispersal by social insects
TLDR
It is stressed that attachment with winged casts of ants and termites may have been a mechanism for the worldwide dispersal of this significant springtail lineage, one of the oldest terrestrial arthropod lineages living today. Expand
Fossil amber reveals springtails’ longstanding dispersal by social insects
TLDR
The specific case of tree resin entrapment represents the (so far) only condition uncovering the phoretic dispersal mechanism of springtails - one of the oldest terrestrial arthropod lineages living today. Expand
Emigrating Together but Not Establishing Together: A Cockroach Rides Ants and Leaves
  • Z. Phillips
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American Naturalist
  • 2021
TLDR
In field experiments, evidence is found for female alate–vectored transmission and it is discovered that roaches use a second hitchhiking step (riding foraged plant material) to infect established colonies and shows that colony development can be an important selection pressure on transmission. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 62 REFERENCES
Associations of mites with social insects
TLDR
This chapter provides the first review of the diversity and biology of all mites associated with all taxa of social insects, and places the important associates into currently accepted families and genera. Expand
Social insect symbionts: evolution in homeostatic fortresses.
TLDR
It is argued that specialized parasites will tend to become less virulent and mutualists less cooperative, compared to those associated with solitary or small-colony hosts, and these processes are expected to contribute to the very high symbiont diversity observed in these nests. Expand
The Costs and Benefits of Genetic Heterogeneity in Resistance against Parasites in Social Insects
TLDR
A necessary condition for the parasite hypothesis is that genetically heterogeneous colonies have a larger suite of parasites that are capable of infecting them, which implies that even if the cost per infection is reduced, this may not be sufficient to offset the increased rate of acquiring infections. Expand
Antbirds parasitize foraging army ants
TLDR
It is shown, through use of exclusion experiments, that ant-following birds are parasites on Eciton burchellii, significantly reducing the ants' success rate in capturing prey. Expand
Parasitic mites of honey bees: life history, implications, and impact.
TLDR
The biology and damage of the three main pest species Acarapis woodi, Varroa jacobsoni, and Tropilaelaps clareae is reviewed, along with detection and control methods. Expand
Parasites, Pathogens, and Polyandry in Social Hymenoptera
TLDR
Evidence of intra-nest kin-recognition mechanisms implies a long evolutionary history of discrepant reproductive interests among colony members resulting from multiple mating, in view of the potential disadvantages stemming from polyandry. Expand
Sexual competition during colony reproduction in army ants
TLDR
It is suggested that males resemble queens not as a form of deceitful mimicry but because under the influence of sexual selection they have come to use the same channels of communication to demonstrate their potential fitness to the workforce as those used by queens. Expand
Caste evolution and ecology: a special worker for novel prey
  • S. Powell, N. Franks
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2005
TLDR
This study suggests that phylogenetic constraints associated with the Eciton lifestyle intensified selection for the exaggerated submajor of E. burchellii, and identifies a new and potentially general scenario for the evolution of physical castes. Expand
A reassessment of the mating system characteristics of the army ant Eciton burchellii
TLDR
It is shown that the number of patrilines represented in the first worker offspring of a young queen is lower than in older queens but it is suggested that this may be due to initial sperm clumping in the queen’s sperm storage organ, rather than to repeated inseminations. Expand
The Evolution Of Multiple Mating In Army Ants
TLDR
Estimates of queen-mating frequency for New World Neivamyrmex and Old World Aenictus species and a comparison of army ants and honeybees suggests that mating systems in these two distantly related groups may have been convergently shaped by strikingly similar selective pressures. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...