Sydney Harbour: what we do and do not know about a highly diverse estuary

@article{Johnston2015SydneyHW,
  title={Sydney Harbour: what we do and do not know about a highly diverse estuary},
  author={E. Johnston and M. Mayer-Pinto and P. Hutchings and E. Marzinelli and S. Ahyong and G. Birch and D. Booth and R. G. Creese and M. Doblin and Will F. Figueira and Paul E. Gribben and T. Pritchard and M. Roughan and P. Steinberg and L. Hedge},
  journal={Marine and Freshwater Research},
  year={2015},
  volume={66},
  pages={1073-1087}
}
Sydney Harbour is a global hotspot for marine and estuarine diversity. Despite its social, economic and biological value, the available knowledge has not previously been reviewed or synthesised. We systematically reviewed the published literature and consulted experts to establish our current understanding of the Harbour’s natural systems, identify knowledge gaps, and compare Sydney Harbour to other major estuaries worldwide. Of the 110 studies in our review, 81 focussed on ecology or biology… Expand
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