Sydney Harbour: a review of anthropogenic impacts on the biodiversity and ecosystem function of one of the world’s largest natural harbours

@article{MayerPinto2015SydneyHA,
  title={Sydney Harbour: a review of anthropogenic impacts on the biodiversity and ecosystem function of one of the world’s largest natural harbours},
  author={Mariana Mayer-Pinto and Emma L. Johnston and Pat A. Hutchings and Ezequiel M. Marzinelli and Shane T Ahyong and Gavin F. Birch and David J. Booth and Robert G. Creese and Martina A Doblin and Will F. Figueira and Paul E. Gribben and Tim Pritchard and Moninya Roughan and Peter D. Steinberg and Luke H. Hedge},
  journal={Marine and Freshwater Research},
  year={2015},
  volume={66},
  pages={1088-1105}
}
Sydney Harbour is a hotspot for diversity. However, as with estuaries worldwide, its diversity and functioning faces increasing threats from urbanisation. This is the first synthesis of threats and impacts in Sydney Harbour. In total 200 studies were reviewed: 109 focussed on contamination, 58 on habitat modification, 11 addressed non-indigenous species (NIS) and eight investigated fisheries. Metal concentrations in sediments and seaweeds are among the highest recorded worldwide and organic… Expand

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