Switching antidepressants after a first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in major depressive disorder: a systematic review.

@article{Ruh2006SwitchingAA,
  title={Switching antidepressants after a first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in major depressive disorder: a systematic review.},
  author={Henricus G. Ruh{\'e} and Jochanan Huyser and Jan A. Swinkels and Aart H. Schene},
  journal={The Journal of clinical psychiatry},
  year={2006},
  volume={67 12},
  pages={
          1836-55
        }
}
OBJECTIVE Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently used as a first antidepressant for major depressive disorder but have response rates of 50% to 60% in daily practice. For patients with insufficient response to SSRIs, switching is often applied. This article aims to systematically review the evidence for switching pharmacotherapy after a first SSRI. DATA SOURCES A systematic literature search (updated until Feb. 10, 2005) in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO (all… 

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