Swift's Explorations of Slavery in Houyhnhnmland and Ireland

@article{Kelly1976SwiftsEO,
  title={Swift's Explorations of Slavery in Houyhnhnmland and Ireland},
  author={Ann Cline Kelly},
  journal={PMLA/Publications of the Modern Language Association of America},
  year={1976},
  volume={91},
  pages={846 - 855}
}
  • A. Kelly
  • Published 1 October 1976
  • History
  • PMLA/Publications of the Modern Language Association of America
Swift recognized that “slavery” was an ambivalent term: on one hand, slavery can be seen as a biological imperative—a natural condition of the innately servile; on the other hand, slavery can be seen as a political accident— a circumstance imposed from without by those with the will and power to oppress. Swift consistently characterized the Irish as “slaves” and called the relationship of Ireland to England “slavery.” In the case of the Irish, Swift feared that their slavery, which may have… 
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